Calendar - Winter

  • Mice

    Winter

    During the winter time, mice do not hibernate and will continue to stay active. When they venture out, they will however stay even closer to the nest. Female mice may continue to have litters, but life will continue as normal for these little rodents. In the winter time, it is more common to find mice inside man made structures. Although mice do prefer to make their homes in quiet places and away from human activity, there is still a great possibility that they will find their way inside a home. 

     

  • Roof Rats

    Winter

    Although rats do not hibernate, their daily activities will decrease during the colder months of winter. However, during especially harsh winters, it is not uncommon to find them tucked away in their burrows for multiple days. Reproduction habits slow, mainly due to the climate change and the limited resources; however, it does not stop. 

  • Norway Rats

    Winter

    Although rats do not hibernate, their daily activities will decrease during the colder months of winter. However, during especially harsh winters, it is not uncommon to find them tucked away in their burrows for multiple days. Reproduction habits slow, mainly due to the climate change and the limited resources; however, it does not stop. 

  • Moles

    Winter

    Small creatures, moles generally do not exceed 6 inches (16 cm) in length and typically weigh close to 3 ounces (75 g). Most species have webbed front claws that make them especially capable diggers.Moles are difficult to trap and populations of the pest are hard to control. Individuals dealing with mole infestations should call Critter Control, as we maintain experienced workforces that specialize in mole removal.

  • Voles

    Winter

    During the winter months voles do not hibernate; they will make tunnels through and under the snow. They will nibble on shrubs and tree bark for nutrition. Voles will cut runway paths through grasses and small plants, feeding on vegetation as they move under the snow. You may not notice this until the snow melts away. 

  • Eastern Gray Squirrel

    Winter

    For the eastern gray squirrel, mating can begin in December or January. The males will fight to determine dominance, and the winner will have a better chance to reproduce. The winner persues the female through the trees until they are stimulated enough to majority of litters are born in March, which the female squirrels are already preparing for now. The eastern gray squirrel does not hibernate in Washington; however, their activity will slow a bit. There are usually several dens that are occupied throughout the year as well as several nests built high in the tree canopy. This would be the best scenario with the eastern gray squirrel. Unfortunately, it is more common to find these squirrels in homes or commercial buildings. Eastern gray squirrels are notorious for getting into man made structures, so much so that they are most commonly found in urban areas as opposed to the other native squirrels in Western Washington. Manmade structures, such as our nice, cozy homes, have become the new norm in terms of where they will co-habitate. Squirrels have been known to store their food cache in attics during the winter, where normally the cache would be stored underground, in tree hollows, or rotting trees. 

  • Douglas Squirrel

    Winter

    Douglas squirrels do not hibernate through the winter. During this time, the douglas squirrels are living off the food reserves they collected during the summer/autumn season and possibly foraging on the left over cones. Sometimes, the stored seeds and nuts are not recovered. That leads to little seedlings sprouting the next year or so. Thus, the douglas squirrel inadvertently helps maintain the health of the forest. They will hunker down at their nest site, either mother and babies or individually. If the weather is good enough, sometimes the mating season may start as soon as February. 

  • Pigeons

    Winter

    Pigeon bodies are traditionally gray with a whitish rump, but the birds may also appear in shades of white, tan, and black. They have characteristic double black stripes on their wing feathers, a single black band on their tail feathers, and bright red feet.As pigeons spread a number of diseases, individuals are safer not approaching them. In areas where pigeon infestations threaten the general public's health and well-being, pest control professionals should be called in to handle the problem.

  • Crows

    Winter

    Crows are entirely black in color, including their bills and feet. They weigh about a pound as adults, and their feathers display a glossy, slightly iridescent quality. In addition to their distinctive black plumage and comparatively large size, crows are recognizable due to the unique cawing sounds they produce.Effective crow control demands quick action, as the pest birds can be difficult to expel once populations are established. Crow control often involves the use of netting or frightening devices to keep the birds out of gardens and away from potential roosting sites. Critter Control of Seattle's crow control services will get rid of crows and prevent return.

  • Rabbits

    Winter

    Rabbits are known as grazer animals and are notorious for damaging plants and grass. They will chew up your gardens and plants, leaving you with an expensive landscaping disaster.There are a few ways to identify if you have a rabbit problem around your home. As mentioned above, rabbits will chew up your garden and landscaping vegetation, particularly new shoots in the spring.

  • Opossums

    Winter

    Quite large, opossums grow around 16 inches (41 cm) long and weigh anywhere from 6 pounds (3 kg) to 12 pounds (6 kg). Including their tails, opossums can reach up to 3 feet (90 cm) long.As opossums carry various diseases and have sharp teeth and claws, individuals should never try to trap the animal without professional assistance.

  • Raccoons

    Winter

    Raccoons in the winter will typically seek out dens, or protected areas where they can live out the cold months. Unfortunately, these little critters will find their way into residential homes or industrial sites on occasion. Their coat will thicken, but will be in proportion to the severity of the winter they are experiencing. A raccoons’ tail will also fatten up, and they will wrap it around themselves much like a blanket. Although food may be scarce, a raccoon is very good at adapting to its circumstances. Raccoons enter a state called torpor, this is much like hibernation however it not precisely the same. This state lowers the mammals’ metabolism, blood sugar, and body temperature. As the amount of energy needed for their survival significantly drops, they are able to sleep through the majority of winter. Torpor allows the raccoons to sleep in their dens for weeks on end, however because they are not hibernating, on warmer days they will emerge from their dens and forage for foods. This is helpful for the raccoons because they will still be alert for predators and possible meals. 

  • Long Tailed Weasel

    Winter

    With the acception of their shiny new white coat of fur, there is no dramatic change in the weasels' behavior during the winter time. They will hunker down in their burrows, which they have stolen from other animals. Due to their prey still being readily available, they are able to continue life as normal through the snowy months. Feasting on rats, mice, voles, chipmunks, or squirrels; the long tailed weasel will use the element of surprise when hunting. Their new white coat helps them blend in with the snow around them, which helps when hunting for prey. But it also helps them being avoided by their own predators such as coyotes, owls, bobcats, or foxes. 

  • Mountain Beavers

    Winter

    During the winter months mountain beavers are typically not seen often. They do not hibernate and will make burrows through the snow to travel. Mountain beavers typically mate during the winter, and their gestation is about 30 days. 

  • River Otter

    Winter

    Otters do not hibernate, meaning they are active all year round even in the cold months of winter. Their thick coat will thicken even more, allowing them to preserve their body heat in the frigid water. Otter life will continue as normal during the winter, males will be defending their territories, and females will be getting prepared for the birth of their next litter. 

  • Fox

    Winter

    This species grows about 3 feet (91 cm) lengthwise and weighs up to 15 pounds (7 kg). Common characteristics include bushy tails, pointed ears, and narrow, elongated snouts. Red foxes have white underbellies, rusty red and orange coats, and black markings, which become more prominent closer to their paws.Foxes are difficult to control. It is best to trust the professionals at Critter Control of Seattle. We will implement necessary habitat modifications and fox exclusion methods to keep foxes out of your home!

  • Bobcat

    Winter

    During winter monts, a babcat will continue to patrol its territory and look for prey. Although they do not hibernate, it is not uncommon for a babcat to remain in its den cor a couple of days. A bobcats' primary diet consists of rabbits and hares, ground squirrels, rodents, and birds. During winter these food sources may be scarce, which leads to the cats taking on larger prey such as beavers, deer, and sometimes livestock.