Calendar - Summer

  • Mice

    Summer

    During the summer months you may hear, or see mice around. Depending on the weather, they may be out in the open fields, and hiding in the tall grasses. However they are so small they can easily be hiding out under your home or in your walls. You may hear scratching, or find piles of stored food in your closets or pantry. They can, and will, almost always cause damage. 

  • Roof Rats

    Summer

    Summer is another season in which you can find rats reproducing, or scurrying around to find new burrows, or areas where they can move to. Infant rats are weaned at about 4 weeks old, and reach sexual maturity at 5 weeks old. Growing families means they need more room to house themselves.

  • Norway Rats

    Summer

    Summer is another season in which you can find rats reproducing, or scurrying around to find new burrows, or areas where they can move to. Infant rats are weaned at about 4 weeks old, and reach sexual maturity at 5 weeks old. Growing families means they need more room to house themselves.

  • Moles

    Summer

    Small creatures, moles generally do not exceed 6 inches (16 cm) in length and typically weigh close to 3 ounces (75 g). Most species have webbed front claws that make them especially capable diggers.Moles are difficult to trap and populations of the pest are hard to control. Individuals dealing with mole infestations should call Critter Control, as we maintain experienced workforces that specialize in mole removal.

  • Voles

    Summer

    Voles enjoy areas with heavy ground cover, such as grasses, grass-like plants, orchards, fields and windbreaks are all favored. It is a good idea to make sure your lawns are mowed and you may take extra caution to those plants, they especially like flower bulbs. Vole damage in Western Washington is usually separated from mole damage by the presence of holes. Moles will make mounds of dirt, often without an evident hole. 

  • Eastern Gray Squirrel

    Summer

    Between June and July is when the second breeding season for eastern gray squirrels will happen. The female will again raise another litter as she did in the spring. By that time, her first litter may have left the nest to find their on territory. The male has no part in the raising of the young. During this time of year, eastern gray squirrels are starting to put on a layer of fat to prepare for the winter. They will start collecting nuts, seeds, and other items to store for the winter while it is more redially available. 

  • Northern Flying Squirrel

    Summer

    During the summer time, northern flying squirrels will begin their hunt for winter reserves.The reason why northern flying squirrels are so elusive is because they are nocturnal and found in densely forested areas. They hunt for their food in the night, which they have perfect eye sight for. Unfortunately, there are many predators that hunt in the night as well. The prominent threats are birds of prey, such as owls, hawks and eagles in the air. On the ground, there are coyotes, bobcats, foxes, weasels, and martins. They must keep constant watch over everything around them, including females that have young with them. In some pockets in Western Washington, the areas that are not too developed and have old grown forest around them, there can be chance encounters with Northern flying squirrels. 

  • Douglas Squirrel

    Summer

    Douglas squirrels are busy finding food to eat and store up for the winter time. Female squirrels with offspring are out and about showing their kits the ropes to survive. Douglas' will be defending their territory from other squirrels with loud vocal calls. For the most part, they are solitary and have a terriroty of about 2-3 acres to themselves. The Douglas squirrel has to bompete with the non-native Eastern gray squirrel for territory and food. During this time, they may be including eggs, nesting birds, baby mice, invertebrates, and other fruits and nuts into their diet. 

  • Townsend Chipmunks

    Summer

    During the summer, female townsend chipmunks will be raising their babies and teaching them how to go about life. Depending on when they were conceived, the kits will emerge from their burrows for the first time in early or late July; when the weather is warm, and food is bountiful. Male townsend chipmunks will be defending their territory and gorging themselves on berries, nuts, and grains. 

  • Swallows

    Summer

    Though they are distinguishable by their flattened, short beaks, most species of swallows vary in appearance. For example, cliff swallows grow to be approximately 5 inches long and weigh just under an ounce. They have red faces, brown undersides, and white foreheads.The safest and legal way to regulate swallow populations is to call professional removal services. Critter Control of Seattle is ready to use our integrated pest management approach. This entails surveying areas in order to exclude and remove swallows from private property.

  • Sparrow

    Summer

    Sparrows are typically chestnut brown on top with tawny or white underbellies and black, gray, or brown patterns on their backs and wings. Males have black bibs, short black beaks, and gray patches on the top of their heads. Females tend to be duller in color with unmarked breasts and tan beaks.Though they are known to coexist peacefully with humans, sparrows are wild animals. As such, people should not attempt to approach or trap the birds. Critter Control of Seattle is prepared to help manage unwanted sparrow problems in effective and humane manners.

  • Pigeons

    Summer

    Pigeon bodies are traditionally gray with a whitish rump, but the birds may also appear in shades of white, tan, and black. They have characteristic double black stripes on their wing feathers, a single black band on their tail feathers, and bright red feet. As pigeons spread a number of diseases, individuals are safer not approaching them. In areas where pigeon infestations threaten the general public's health and well-being, pest control professionals should be called in to handle the problem.

  • Starlings

    Summer

    Chunky and roughly blackbird-sized, starlings grow between 7 and 9 inches (20 and 23 cm) in length and weigh about 3 ounces (about 90 g). They have strong jaws and long, pointed beaks that are well suited to plucking insects out of the ground. Starling feathers are dark, usually black, and change depending on the season, displaying white spots in the winter and glossy sheens in the summer.Starlings become aggressive when they feel threatened, and approaching them is unnecessarily dangerous. If flocks of the pest bird are causing problems, Critter Control of Seattle technicians should be called to eradicate infestations.

  • Northern Flicker Woodpecker

    Summer

    Woodpeckers typically have red markings on their heads and long, sharply pointed beaks built for sustained rapping on trees. Most common types of woodpeckers also have black and white plumage.When woodpecker populations get out of hand, contact Critter Control. Our technicians are trained in humane and thorough pest removal and are familiar with woodpecker behavior.

  • Gulls

    Summer

    Most gulls are white with gray or black markings. They have webbed feet, slightly hooked bills, and large wings. Gulls are excellent fliers and swimmers, which makes them perfectly suited for coastal living. They make a variety of cries, from high-pitched mewling squeaks to coarse squawks.Seabirds, such as ring-billed and herring gulls, are federally protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which prohibits individuals from hunting, trapping, removing, or interfering with the nests of gulls without federal permits. If traditional frightening or exclusion tactics fail, individuals should call Critter Control of Seattle to deal with problematic birds.

  • Crows

    Summer

    Crows are entirely black in color, including their bills and feet. They weigh about a pound as adults, and their feathers display a glossy, slightly iridescent quality. A relatively large bird, the American crow has a wingspan of up to 36 inches.As they congregate and roost in such large numbers, crows frequently prove challenging to remove, especially for untrained persons. In fact, amateur crow removal attempts can actually exacerbate the problem by causing the birds to move to another, possibly worse location. For effective crow removal service, contact the trained professionals at Critter Control.

  • Bats

    Summer

    With summer, us wildlife operators have to be careful with bat situations. This is the peak time when bats have had the majority of their pups and colonize together. These are called nurseries. Young pups are completely reliant on their mothers until they are able to fly. That sometimes will not be until September. We as professionals are limited to do secondary exclusion work to seal off other areas, while leaving the main entry open for the adults to come and go. Once the pups are old enough to fly on their own, that is when we put a device to allow the bats to leavbe without being able to get back inside the structure. That is the most humane way of resolving bat issues in a structure. Usually the bats will then find a more natural are to move off to. 

  • Snakes

    Summer 

    Summer is the time of year where garter snakes are most active. You can easialy find them basking in the sun, or stalking their next meal. Garter snakes are primarily diurnal, meaning they are active during the day. However, they may have some nocturnal tendencies. Snakes will feed all day long, but on extremely hot days they will most likely feed in the early mornings, or evenings when the temperature is not so extreme. Throughout the summer, the female snakes are preparing to gibe birth to 10-70 young between July and early October. Their offspring is born alive, and are completely independent as soon as they emerge from the womb.

  • Rabbits

    Summer

    Rabbits are known as grazer animals and are notorious for damaging plants and grass. They will chew up your gardens and plants, leaving you with an expensive landscaping disaster.There are a few ways to identify if you have a rabbit problem around your home. As mentioned above, rabbits will chew up your garden and landscaping vegetation, particularly new shoots in the spring.

  • Skunks

    Summer

    Summer time is the most active season for striped skunks. When the young begin to grow, and their mother can’t tolerate their energy being restricted to the nest, they will begin to venture. Following their mothers in a single file line, they will begin to forage and play. At this time the kits and mother have little to fear due to their developed anal glands. By one month of age, the young skunks can (and will if there is a need) spray. The spray that is released out of two anal glands is potent enough that it deters bobcats, coyotes, cougars, and humans. When a skunk is eaten by one of these predators it is as a last resort. The biggest threat to the young skunks are great horned owls. These birds of prey have a very undeveloped sense of smell, and are nocturnal. This means a skunk in the night is no match for this bird of prey. During summer, male skunks will wander about in search of their next meal. Male and female skunks stick to a relatively small area, and do not defend their territories much like other animals. Because striped skunks are primarily nocturnal, the best time to see one is at dawn or dusk, when they are waking up or getting ready to tuck into their den. 

  • Opossums

    Summer

    Quite large, opossums grow around 16 inches (41 cm) long and weigh anywhere from 6 pounds (3 kg) to 12 pounds (6 kg). Including their tails, opossums can reach up to 3 feet (90 cm) long.As opossums carry various diseases and have sharp teeth and claws, individuals should never try to trap the animal without professional assistance.

  • Raccoons

    Summer

    Summers for baby raccoons means outings with their mother, learning how to forage and climb, and becoming more independent. As they establish themselves, the young males will begin to wander further, and further from their mother. Eventually they will wander and never come back. Young females however, are a little bit different. They will spend their first winter with their mother, and eventually leave her during the next breeding season. Raccoons are nocturnal, which means they are most active at night. So during the summer months, you may be able to see them wandering around or foraging while you are relaxing on your patio at sunset. 

  • Long Tailed Weasel

    Summer

    Oddly enough, summer time is when long tailed weasels will breed. Typically between July and August is when this will take place. It is not un-common for females to mate again while they are already rearing their litter from the previous year. In summer, with their litter born from the previous year, the kits will be learning day to day how to grow and support themselves. They will be opening their eyes during this time, and exploring the world with their mother. With a gestation that lasts about 10 months; the kits who are conceived during this summer, will not be born until the following spring. This is because the female will hold the males ingredient until it is needed for reproduction. This process is called delayed fertilization. Male long tailed weasel will be scavenging and looking for a suitable mate. During the summer, the diet of the long tailed weasels consists of small prey such as mice, rats, baby birds, eggs, and voles. However this is only their day to day meals. Sometimes, when a weasel gets a little bit more confident they will go after prey larger than them such as rabbits, birds, larger fish, and reptiles. 

  • Mountain Beavers

    Summer

    During the summer months you can find signs of mountain beavers in the plats and shrubs, although they are rarely seen. Mountain beavers eat most ferns along with deciduoud trees leaves and then they will eat the bark and seedlings of conifers and deciduous trees. Seedlings are their primary target and the damage sign is the base of the tree is cut at a 45 degree angle. The mountain beaver will also strip the bark from the base of the tree. They love rhododendron which we have plenty of here in Washington. During the summer, most of the burrowing occurs. They construct tunnels 5-7 inches in diameter, each burrow has five below ground chambers. The chambers have different purposes including nesting, feeding, refuse (debris or decayed food), toilet, and earth (excess earth and stones). With this intricate tunnel system, they can also have 10-30 entry and exit holes. 

  • Beavers

    Summer

    Summer time is when the adult beavers are enjoying the benefits of parenthood. Once kits are born, it takes no time for them to become adventurous of their surroundings. Kits can swim within 24 hours of being born. They start adventuring out of the lodge within weeks. This then gives the parents an early opportunity to teach their young ones the in and outs of beaver life. Beavers have been known to be naturally instinctual; while others have to learn how to be a beaver. 

  • Muskrats

    Summer

    Typically dark brown in color, muskrats have dense coats that are practically waterproof and covered in coarse guard hairs. They grow up to 24 inches in length and weigh around 4 pounds. As muskrats reproduce quickly and become aggressive when cornered, trapping and removing them without professional assistance can be both dangerous and time-consuming.

  • Nutria

    Summer

    Nutria have coarse yellow-brown to reddish-brown hair on their top coat, while their underfur is denser, soft, and gray in color. With triangular-shaped heads, small ears and eyes, and noticeable orange-tinted incisors, nutria look similar to large, stout rats. The rodent grows to an average of 2 feet in length and weighs as much as 20 pounds. Individuals should never try to trap and remove nutria on their own. As the animal may be carrying a variety of pathogens and parasites, mishandling can lead to serious health risks. Contact a trained wildlife specialist to remove and humanely relocate nutria populations. Critter Control of Seattle technicians have the knowledge, tools, and training to do so efficiently and safely.

  • River Otter

    Summer

    During the summer, female otters will be continuing to raise their pups. By this time the pup’s eyes will be open, and they’ll be bouncing about. Otters are very playful creatures, and will typically be friendly with each other. Except for males protecting their territory; they’re pretty peaceful animals. As young pups grow and learn, you can find them playing in the water with their mother and siblings. By the time late summer arrives, the pups will be confident swimmers and diving to retrieve their own food. 

  • Fox

    Summer

    This species grows about 3 feet (91 cm) lengthwise and weighs up to 15 pounds (7 kg). Common characteristics include bushy tails, pointed ears, and narrow, elongated snouts. Red foxes have white underbellies, rusty red and orange coats, and black markings, which become more prominent closer to their paws.Foxes are difficult to control. It is best to trust the professionals at Critter Control of Seattle. We will implement necessary habitat modifications and fox exclusion methods to keep foxes out of your home!

  • Coyote

    Summer

    In western states, coyotes that live in the desert have light brown or tan fur, while coyotes residing in mountains or forested areas of eastern states are often darker brown or gray in color. Their coarse fur and bushy tails grow thicker during cold months. Wild coyotes should never be approached. Although physically similar to dogs, coyotes are not domesticated animals and will bite if cornered or threatened.

  • Bobcat

    Summer

    Bobcats are nocturnal, which means they are primarily active during night. However, you may hear or see them towards dusk and dawn. During summer, you can find them prowling in the moonlight for their next meal. Male bobcats will be on the prowl for any females that may be in hear, or any other males that are lurking around in his territory. Although bobcats will purposefully  steer clear of eachother due to the fact that in most bobcat fights, they will be severely injured, or only one will walk away. The mother babcats will be exploring with her kittens and teaching them along the way. At a very young age bobcats are deadly animals, however they will stay with their mother until they are 6-9 months old.