Calendar - Autumn

  • Mice

    Autumn

    When fall and autumn set in, the mouse may have another litter of babies as they did in the spring. They may also begin preparing for winter and seek out shelter and warmth. Many times they will find this in barns, sheds, or even your home. During this time you may hear gnawing, because if they don't their teeth can over grow. Because of their physical capabilities they are able to gain entry into sstructures by gnawing, climbing, jumping and swimming. Mice constantly explore and learn about their environment. They are great about memorizing locations and pathways, obsticles and food, water and shelther, and other elements in their domain. 

  • Roof Rats

    Autumn

    Autumn is the time of year where their reproduction habits may slow, but not stop completely. They will be preparing for the winter, gathering food for their colony, and extending their burrows. Rats forage year-round and do not hibernate, but if they are expecting a significantly harsh winter thy will begin to fatten up. 

  • Norway Rats

    Autumn

    Autumn is the time of year where their reproduction habits may slow, but not stop completely. They will be preparing for the winter, gathering food for their colony, and extending their burrows. Rats forage year-round and do not hibernate, but if they are expecting a significantly harsh winter thy will begin to fatten up. 

  • Moles

    Autumn

    Small creatures, moles generally do not exceed 6 inches (16 cm) in length and typically weigh close to 3 ounces (75 g). Most species have webbed front claws that make them especially capable diggers.Moles are difficult to trap and populations of the pest are hard to control. Individuals dealing with mole infestations should call Critter Control, as we maintain experienced workforces that specialize in mole removal.

  • Voles

    Autumn

    Voles are typically solitary rodents, however once autumn sets in they change to social critters and have a commnal nesting site. The vole does not have a specific breeding season, and can breed continuously throughout the year. They can have 1-5 litters per year, with each producing 3-6 young. 

  • Eastern Gray Squirrel

    Autumn

    The eastern gray squirrel is really in full swing of consuming lots of fatty foods. Oil rich nuts, for example are a popular food for squirrels to consume because of the extra fat. The will also stash nuts, seeds, and other food sources in hiding places to go back to during the winter time. The litter from summer may or may not stay with the mother through the winter. Sometimes the mother will push out the males and keep her female offspring in the nest with her. The eastern gray squirrel will also shed its spring/summer coat, and start growing a coat made more for winter. They will shed their winter coat in the spring when it is warmer and they do not need a thick coat anymore. 

  • Northern Flying Squirrel

    Autumn

    Autumn is when things slow down a little bit, and the preservation of their food supplies starts to ramp up. With trees that still have their cones or nuts, the northern flying squirrel will continue collecting for its winter stash. Sometimes, the nuts and seeds will never be recovered. So, squirrels hiding seeds and nuts helps the forest replant itself. The squirrels will also molt (shed) its fur coat in preparation for winter, which will come in thicker for the winter weather. They will use the shed fur to line its nest. Their coloration is a cinnamon to gray-brown for the body, and a cream colored belly, which helps in the night time to disguise itself with the darker colors in forests they reside in. 

  • Douglas Squirrel

    Autumn

    Watch your step! Sometimes in the autumn time, the Douglas squirrel may toss its remnants out of the tree it is harvesting the edibles from. You may also hear warning "barks" as you are passing through their territory. They do become quite territorial in the autumn time to ward off any other squirrels from getting their food source or find their food reserves. Douglas squirrels will then collect its harves and store in various hiding spots, suck as old woodpecker holes, hollows in trees or logs, or under forest debris that the squirrel piles together. You may be able to see where a douglas squirrel has been because you will see middens (trash heaps of cone/seed materials) piling on the ground. Their favorite trees are foniferous due to the cones the trees produce that have seeds for them to eat.

  • Pigeons

    Autumn

    Pigeon bodies are traditionally gray with a whitish rump, but the birds may also appear in shades of white, tan, and black. They have characteristic double black stripes on their wing feathers, a single black band on their tail feathers, and bright red feet.As pigeons spread a number of diseases, individuals are safer not approaching them. In areas where pigeon infestations threaten the general public's health and well-being, pest control professionals should be called in to handle the problem.

  • Northern Flicker Woodpecker

    Autumn

    Woodpeckers typically have red markings on their heads and long, sharply pointed beaks built for sustained rapping on trees. Most common types of woodpeckers also have black and white plumage.When woodpecker populations get out of hand, contact Critter Control. Our technicians are trained in humane and thorough pest removal and are familiar with woodpecker behavior.

  • Crows

    Autumn

    Crows are entirely black in color, including their bills and feet. They weigh about a pound as adults, and their feathers display a glossy, slightly iridescent quality. In addition to their distinctive black plumage and comparatively large size, crows are recognizable due to the unique cawing sounds they produce.Effective crow control demands quick action, as the pest birds can be difficult to expel once populations are established. Crow control often involves the use of netting or frightening devices to keep the birds out of gardens and away from potential roosting sites. Critter Control of Seattle's crow control services will get rid of crows and prevent return.

  • Opossums

    Autumn

    Quite large, opossums grow around 16 inches (41 cm) long and weigh anywhere from 6 pounds (3 kg) to 12 pounds (6 kg). Including their tails, opossums can reach up to 3 feet (90 cm) long.As opossums carry various diseases and have sharp teeth and claws, individuals should never try to trap the animal without professional assistance.

  • Raccoons

    Autumn

    As the leaves begin to change once again, a raccoons food intake will raise. This is because they need to fatten up for the oncoming winter and scarce food supply. During this time, they are also looking for a suitable den to sleep through the winter. Due to daylight savings, you may see raccoons earlier than sunset because of the time change. 

  • Long Tailed Weasel

    Autumn

    During this time of year, the long tailed weasel is beginning to prepare for the winter ahead. Typically in the northern areas they will shed their summer coat of brown and tan, and grow a new pure white coat, except for the black tip of their tail which is present all year round.  They may fatten themselves up a bit for the winter, but will continue to scavenge throughout the winter. At this time, many of the females will have successfully weaned their litters, and the kits will be off to find their own territories. This however, does pose a threat to the young weasels. If found by another rival weasel, a bloody battle will commence. Long tailed weasels are extremely aggressive, and tend to be over confident when threatening other much larger predators. 

  • Mountain Beavers

    Autumn

    The mountain beavers typically live in we forests and meadows, they are usually found on hill sides with partly drug begetation near the holes. In the autumn the mountain beaver will pile vegetation near the burrown until it becomes wilted or dries out. By stacking and allowing the vegetation to dry some, it will help lower the moisture content before bringing it into the nest, this also helps prevent mold from growing in the burrow and helps regulate the temperature inside. The mountain beaver needs to live underground to help regulate their body temperature. Once they move the vegetation inside it will be eaten or used as nest lining. They are active throughout night and day bur are rarely found far from their burrows. 

  • River Otter

    Autumn

    By this time of year, pups born in the spring time may begin to look for their own territories. They’re regularly seen during this time far from bodies of water or rivers. This is because they’re dispersing to unclaimed rivers, lakes, ponds, or streams. However, this does not mean all pups are going to be weaned from their mother. Some will stay with the mother until she gives birth to her next litter, and at this time the remaining pups will disperse to their own territories. Being efficient in just about everything a river otter does, they will be able to sustain themselves and have successful little otter lives. 

  • Fox

    Autumn

    This species grows about 3 feet (91 cm) lengthwise and weighs up to 15 pounds (7 kg). Common characteristics include bushy tails, pointed ears, and narrow, elongated snouts. Red foxes have white underbellies, rusty red and orange coats, and black markings, which become more prominent closer to their paws.Foxes are difficult to control. It is best to trust the professionals at Critter Control of Seattle. We will implement necessary habitat modifications and fox exclusion methods to keep foxes out of your home!

  • Coyote

    Autumn

    In western states, coyotes that live in the desert have light brown or tan fur, while coyotes residing in mountains or forested areas of eastern states are often darker brown or gray in color. Their coarse fur and bushy tails grow thicker during cold months. Wild coyotes should never be approached. Although physically similar to dogs, coyotes are not domesticated animals and will bite if cornered or threatened.

  • Bobcat

    Autumn

    During autumn, is when some kittens born earlier than most, will begin to look for their own territories. Also, at this time they will be fattening up to prepare for winter. Bobcats do not hibernate; however, their intake of prey does increase. This is because food sources can be scarce during the winter months, and an increased amount of fat is needed.